Psychology key terms

Social influence Social influence is an overarching term given to describe the persuasive effects people have on each other. It is seen as a fundamental value in social psychology and overlaps considerably with research on attitudes and persuasion. The three main areas of social influence include:

Psychology key terms

Decentre Jean Piaget argued that to decentre is to be able to take into account more than one aspect of a situation at a time. According to Piaget, this type of thinking was typical of a child in the pre-operational stage. The ability to conserve is an example of the ability to decentre.

Defence mechanism A strategy Psychology key terms by the mind to defend itself from anxiety provoking thoughts. In Freud's study of Little Hans he identified the Psychology key terms mechanism known as identification with the aggressor. Whereby Little Hans stresses all the ways that he is similar to his father, adopting his father's attitudes, mannerisms and actions, feeling that if his father sees him as similar, he will not feel hostile towards him.

Study Flashcards On Developmental Psychology Key Terms Ch. at caninariojana.com Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. caninariojana.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!/5(1). Forensic psychology is a specialty in professional psychology characterized by activities primarily intended to provide professional psychological expertise within the judicial and legal systems. Psychotherapy The attempt to help an individual or group come to terms with, accept, and deal with psychological and emotional feelings and ideas Psychology the study of the mental and emotional thoughts, feelings, and activities of an individual or group; the study of the mental processes of human beings; the study of emotion-based thoughts.

Any aspect of a study which has an influence on participants to do or answer what is expected of them. A dissociative disorder where an individual loses their sense of identity. See the studies by Zimbardo and Rosenhan.

Descriptive Statistics Statistics are a method of summarising and analysing data for the purpose of drawing conclusions about the data. Carrying out psychological research often involves collecting a lot of data. As psychologists therefore we need to have knowledge of statistics so that we can make conclusions about our data.

We can make a distinction between descriptive and inferential statistics. Descriptive statistics simply offer us a way to describe a summary of our data. Inferential statistics go a step further and allow us to make a conclusion related to our hypothesis.

Descriptive statistics give us a way to summarise and describe our data but do not allow us to make a conclusion related to our hypothesis. When carrying out a test of difference activity C there are two main ways of summarising the data using descriptive statistics. The first way is to carry out of measure of central tendency mean, median or mode for each of the two conditions.

The mean is calculated by adding all the scores together in each condition and then dividing by the number of scores. This is a useful statistic as it takes all of the scores into account but can be misleading if there are extreme values. For example if the scores on a memory test were 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 42, the mean would be 10 which is not typical or representative of the data.

The median is calculated by finding the mid point in on ordered list. The median is calculated by placing all the values of one condition in order and finding the mid- point. This is a more useful measure than the mean when there are extreme values. The mode is the most common value in a set of values.

The second way of summarising and describing data is to calculate a measure of dispersion. This simply shows us the spread of a set of data. A simple way of calculating the measure of dispersion is to calculate the range. The range is the difference between the smallest and largest value in a set of scores.

Although it is a fairly crude measure of dispersion as any one high or low scale can distort the data.

Flashcards - AP Psychology Unit 2 Key Terms

A more sophisticated measure of dispersion is the standard deviation which tells us how much on average scores differ from the mean. When carrying out correlational analysis the data is summarised by presenting the data in a scattergram. It is important that the scattergram has a title and both axes are labelled.

From the scattergram we may be able to say whether there is a strong positive correlation, a weak positive correlation, no correlation, a weak negative correlation or a strong negative correlation but we can not make a conclusion about the hypothesis.key region for read/writing pureword blindness - alexia without agraphia damage to angualr gyrus and both visual cortex's.

reading is prevented but the perosn can still . Psychotherapy The attempt to help an individual or group come to terms with, accept, and deal with psychological and emotional feelings and ideas Psychology the study of the mental and emotional thoughts, feelings, and activities of an individual or group; the study of the mental processes of human beings; the study of emotion-based thoughts.

Abnormal Psychology Key Terms: 1.

Psychology key terms

A is a condition in which a person's thoughts, feelings, and behavior interfere with normal psychosocial functioning. 2. The theory that disordered thoughts and behavior result from a disease or otherwise malfunctioning caninariojana.com called.

3. A. In the wake of psychoanalysis and behaviorism, humanistic psychology emerges as the "third force" in psychology. Led by Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow, who publishes Motivation and Personality in , this approach centers on the conscious mind, free . Schizophrenia A severe psychological disorder that is characterized by highly disordered thought processes.

Psychology key terms

undifferentiated schizophrenia A type of schizophrenia that is characterized by disorganized behavior, hallucinations, delusions, and incoherence.

Key Psychological Terms & Counselling Phrases. Archetype: In analytical psychology, an archetype is an inherited mental structure or pattern which forms part of the collective unconscious.

Archetypes are only observable through their manifestations in behaviour especially that associated with ancient and universal experiences such as births, marriage, motherhood, and death.

Key Terms for Memory | Psych Exam Review